CYCLINGFORUM.COM - Where Cyclists Talk Tech --- Return To Home

 

    Register FAQ'sSearchProfileLog In / Log Out

 

****

cyclingforum.com ****

HOMECLUBS | SPONSORS | FEATURESPHOTO GALLERYTTF DONORS | SHOP FOR GEAR

Return to CyclingForum Home Page CYCLING TECH TALK FORUM
          View posts since last visit

Endurance bike - Infinito v. Domane
 Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

Author Thread Post new topic Reply to topic
Marc N.
Joined: 12 Jan 2004
Posts: 396
Location: Israel

1/1/17 3:47 AM

Good for you!

Dan- I only hope that you will enjoy your Domane as much as I do mine, and that it will at least meet, or even exceed your expectations.

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

greglepore
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 1557
Location: SE Pa, USA

1/1/17 9:17 AM

Jealous. I wish they made the Koppenburg in small sizes, I'd be
all over it.

Let me know whatcha think after a ride or two.

One of the advantages of doing a part time gig at the bike shop is Trek University, if you do enough study you can buy a bike at bellow wholesale...Project One Domane or Madone would be good...

Love dem FRC's...

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

Campyman
Joined: 14 Mar 2004
Posts: 28
Location: Wausau, WI

1/1/17 1:38 PM

Koppenburg Domane

I too wish the Koppenburg came in a 54, the smallest size is a 56. The TT on the 56 is a bit to long for me.

 Reply to topic    

Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 15528
Location: Portland, OR

1/1/17 2:47 PM

"Koppenburg Domane"

I ruled it out quickly. Having ridden an early Domane or two, and noticing the front rear inbalance tactile so demonstrably.... There would be no way I could do it without at least trying the SLR. I kind of got bit on the Roubaix SL4 in the comfort dept. Perhaps partial or total function/result of the disc frame required strengths.

I would like to ride both a disc and non disc Domane SLR, but I am sure to a large degree another disc bike is off the table with the Strong build last year.

So it took until these latest improvements in the Domane line for it to make sense to be viable for my interests. And interested I am...

I will go test ride one in a while, and infect myself with the purpose to drive toward doing one up. ;)

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

henoch
Joined: 12 Jan 2004
Posts: 1453

1/2/17 8:27 AM

Happy New Year Dan and congrats on the new ride, sounds like a sweet bike.
Keep us posted on how it rides.

 Reply to topic    

Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 15528
Location: Portland, OR

1/4/17 5:45 PM

Saw this on eBay NIB, so it should be register-able and warranty valid etc.

2017 Domane SLR Disc Frameset in the BOX. $2250.00.
be a nice start. Not looking to start over with thru axle wheels when I just built a few new normal sets last season.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/152298387778?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

dfcas
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2360
Location: hillbilly heaven

1/4/17 5:58 PM

Most warranties state that it must be purchased from an authorized dealer and if this has been sold at retail it would be considered used and therefore no warranty. Is it a Trek dealer selling it?

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

dfcas
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2360
Location: hillbilly heaven

1/4/17 6:00 PM

Most warranties state that it must be purchased from an authorized dealer and if this has been sold at retail it would be considered used and therefore no warranty. Is it a Trek dealer selling it?

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 15528
Location: Portland, OR

1/4/17 7:04 PM

Dunno, I was done when I found it was actually a disc frame. The picture before he updated it upon my RFI was of a non disc frame even though it said disc in the title...

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

dfcas
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2360
Location: hillbilly heaven

1/4/17 7:07 PM

Is the day coming when all new frames will be disc?

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 15528
Location: Portland, OR

1/4/17 8:35 PM

Just FYI, the RSL Koppenberg Domane is longer as well as lower. [as it should be]

HTA steeper and an obvious go faster bike than the 'endurance' Domane H2s. More rake less trail, etc. I bet it would be a better go fast bike with that neutral linear front feel probably...

But, no front ISO de-coupler to be clear, so kinda like a Madone with more tire clearance? I run 25 GP4 on wide rims which caliper out to 28-9 and has pretty good clearance to boot.

Although my 2016 Project One Series 4 almost fits a 32. As in a 28mm GP4Ks on a wide rim that calipers out to just under 32, but touches on the Madone so no go. That tire on a 25mm wide Pacenti on the Disc Strong is 32.4mm FWIW.

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 3687
Location: Nashua, NH

1/4/17 8:42 PM

Is the day coming when all new frames will be disc?

It probably won't happen anytime soon for road bikes. There are still weight advantages for caliper brakes and few disadvantages for most recreational riders and racers. The primary benefits to roadies are for people who ride a lot in wet conditions. Touring riders and tandem riders will benefit greatly from disk brakes, which handle the heavy loads much better than calipers.

For 'cross and gravel bikes, that day is pretty much here already. I don't recall seeing any new frame designs that aren't disk-only. For MTBs, it happened well over a decade ago.

 Reply to topic    

dan emery
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 5706
Location: Maine

1/5/17 10:26 AM

Koppenberg Domane

I don't think they make it any more - it's not on the website. An endurance bike with aggressive geometry seems like a bit of a contradiction in terms, other than maybe for a professional classics rider.

 Reply to topic    

Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 15528
Location: Portland, OR

1/5/17 10:35 AM

It looks like basically the upper end H1 Madone with the seatpost ISO/Decoupler is similar if not the same and replaced it.

"An endurance bike with aggressive geometry seems like a bit of a contradiction"

And where they have gone with the Madone now??

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

dfcas
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2360
Location: hillbilly heaven

1/5/17 12:44 PM

My disc brake question was about road frames. I know all the plus and minus issues. I've had a disc brake bike since 2000.

it sure does complicate inventory for dealers. Considering colors,sizes, component levels and brake choice, it seems the industry would want to go 1 way or the other.

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 15528
Location: Portland, OR

1/5/17 1:03 PM

"Is the day coming when all new frames will be disc?"

I think I was afraid to address that directly. But can't we really see that day coming? Question is when, and will all my wheels be ready to be replaced by then. ;)

I specifically do not want a disc road bike at this point. But at that point that opinion may well be moot.

I hace one disc 29er and one disc All Road. The Strong does not see much use in the road season, the road bike I don't use in the winter season.

But for the future ride with one bike [imagine?] I can totally see one disc road bike. But maybe, just maybe it will be all Domane types, and Gravel variants just getting called something else by then?

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 3687
Location: Nashua, NH

1/5/17 10:02 PM

It depends on the market segment

There will always be caliper brakes at the low end of the road market due to their lower cost, just as there are still MTBs with V-brakes. At the high end of the market, there will probably be caliper brake options, due to weight advantages. It's in the middle market where disks will become ubiquitous and probably pretty soon; I would guess within five years.

 Reply to topic    

dan emery
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 5706
Location: Maine

1/6/17 9:49 AM

one problem with discs

The etap hoods for disc systems are indescribably Fugly.

I don't want 'em anyway, no discs on my Domane.

If the Madone is now the classics bike that leaves the Domane for geezers like me.

 Reply to topic    

Campyman
Joined: 14 Mar 2004
Posts: 28
Location: Wausau, WI

1/6/17 12:34 PM

Domane and other Trek Race Team Bikes

The Trek team ride Stock sized bikes with a different Carbon layup to make the BB area and HT area stiffer. This goes for the Domane, Madone, Emonda and the CX Boone's of the Telenet team.

The team riders have access to any bike they want for the races. Most of the riders choose the Domane SLR for the Cobbled Classic (Flanders & Roubaix) and the Madone for the non Cobbled Classic like San Remo.

I have an inside connection at Trek, most serious cyclist that live in WI like I do know someone that works there.

A friend of mine has a Radio Shack/Nissan era Madone that he says is stiff as hell....next to ZERO flex in the BB and it corners like its on rails.

 Reply to topic    

Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 15528
Location: Portland, OR

1/6/17 1:22 PM

I wonder if getting the flexiest handle bars possibly with one of the carbon seatposts made to move/flex [not just up and down], especially on a compact frame showing a lot of post would not add up to Domane land, to what degree is the question. ;)

I saw an old review showing carbon bars stiffness. The loser being the most flexible of most interest me.

Between the 125mm Ti quill and stupid light 1" handle bars on my Steel lugged Reynolds 753 frame, it is mighty comfortable to ride. ;)

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 3687
Location: Nashua, NH

1/7/17 10:34 PM

That's the main reason I don't use carbon bars

Every one I've seen is too damned stiff. The talk of "vibration damping" is BS; stiff is stiff, period. Between that, the high price and durability considerations, I haven't found any good reason to use them. I don't use carbon seatposts or stems for the same reasons.

 Reply to topic    

Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 15528
Location: Portland, OR

1/8/17 12:24 AM

http://blog.fairwheelbikes.com/reviews-and-testing/road-handlebar-review/

 Reply to topic     Send e-mail

dddd
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 3126
Location: NorCal

1/8/17 12:27 AM

At the last CX race I entered this season, an out of town friend had to bow out when his very expensive Zipp carbon bar was broken in a mere tip-over during practice.
I myself broke a bar while JRA during practice about ten years ago, but it was an old Japanese alloy bar from a very cheap old bike. I chose it because it was light, but now use a heavier-gage Nitto handlebar of otherwise similar dimensions.

The damping coefficient claimed for carbon structures can't help with impact loadings from bumps in the road (the damping coefficient is still far too low for this), but where high-frequency resonances may exist along the length of a tube this small damping coefficient may make a significant difference as exemplified by the more-muted sound from typical carbon frames. A handlebar in particular, with it's free-standing ends, might offer a lessened buzz factor as perceived by the rider, if made of carbon.
Like Bob alluded, the key to unobtrusive compliance can come down to where in the bike's load path that compliance (flex) is added, and I have preferred the lightest alloy bars myself over the years. The infamous French so-called "death" stems of the old days had a LOT of flex in their hollow extension, but I mostly prefer to avoid those even though my physique and riding style don't much twist the bars back and forth.

 Reply to topic    

dan emery
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 5706
Location: Maine

1/8/17 7:33 AM

Bars is bars

At least as far as I can tell. I have Modolo carbon bars on the Ottrott I rode for 9 seasons, alloy on everything else from Zipp on the RS back to old Cinelli and 3 ttt, if there's any difference in ride attributable to any of them I couldn't tell you what it is. Not saying there isn't, just that I don't notice.

It will be fun testing the Domane. Plenty of bad pavement here and I have washboard dirt roads nearby I've ridden mostly with a cross bike, but also mountain and road bikes. I think bouncing the Domane over that with various rear settings will give me an idea what the fancy stuff is doing (or not). I'm not buying the bike for that type of riding, but I've ridden those roads enough that I'm sure I will have some thoughts (though I don't expect the Domane to be as compliant as the cross bike with 33 tires). The Domane will have tubeless 26s on fairly wide rims so those may not be bad either. The Domane also has carbon bars (alloy stem).

I'll be a bit conflicted when I get it as the roads will be a mess with sand, slush and crap but I'll be curious to ride it.

 Reply to topic    

Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 3687
Location: Nashua, NH

1/8/17 8:09 AM

You may be pleasantly surprised...

...at the amount of rear compliance with the Domane. It doesn't feel the same as a soft, wide tire, but the compliance is definitely there and is quite noticeable on bigger hits that might bottom a tire against the rim. It also doesn't suffer from the bobbing that you get with squishy tires, though you may notice some movement.

I can't speak about the front compliance of the SLR, as I haven't ridden one.

As for when to take it out on the road, I'd wait until after the next big rain washes the roads. We're bound to get a warmer spell and rain in the next month or so.

 Reply to topic    


Return to CyclingForum Home Page CYCLING TECH TALK FORUM
           View New Threads Since My Last Visit VIEW THREADS SINCE MY LAST VISIT
           Start a New Thread

 Display posts from previous:   


Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next  
Last Thread | Next Thread  >  

  
  

 


If you enjoy this site, please consider pledging your support

cyclingforum.com - where cyclists talk tech
Cycling TTF Rides Throughout The World

Cyclingforum is powered by SYNCRONICITY.NET in Denver, Colorado -

Powered by phpBB: Copyright 2006 phpBB Group | Custom phpCF Template by Syncronicity