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If you're building wheels
 

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Nick Payne
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 2449
Location: Canberra, Australia

1/25/13 4:44 PM

If you're building wheels

This web page is worth a read for its thoughts on rims: http://fairwheelbikes.com/cycling-blog/products/2013-rim-roundup.html

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dddd
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 3279
Location: NorCal

1/25/13 7:37 PM

Thanks for that.

I've been a believer in wide rims since the 1990's, and these new rims offer some exciting possibilities.

I like that H+son made a wide, trad'l profile rim in bare polish, looking like a 1970's tubular rim and available in 36h for my old hubs.

The author thinks the Open Pro is completely obsolete, and was involved in the design of the Pacenti SL23, which offers a high-performing combination of parameters.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17506
Location: Portland, OR

1/25/13 7:53 PM

I got 1/2 my wheels [not counting tubies] into the wider rims now. I put 29er wheels on the Poprad to get 24mm wide on that set, and my 7801-SL are 22mm, and old faithful D/A 9s set are upgraded from OP to A23s in 2012.

When the Aerohead rim get shot, A23s going on those. 19.5mm OPros are passe~ for me, except one last set for when my kid needs some wheels I figure...

Still use 23C on narrow rims only on the Roubaix, seems like it would still ride well on just the rims. ;)
Oddly, the Klein also rode beautifully on the same narrow rimmed wheels with 23c on. Blowing the Aluminum ride like shit theory for me....

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4528
Location: Nashua, NH

1/26/13 8:05 AM

Nice write-up

I'm glad to see that aftermarket rim choices are expanding again, at least in clinchers. I'm intrigued by the wider rims, but I'm not sure the brakes on my bikes would accommodate them. The Pacenti rim looks very interesting, should I decide to build a premium alloy wheelset.

However, I have to say that I'm very fond of the Kinlin XR270, especially since I can get them for under 40 bucks from Bikehubstore.com (Brandon offers a 10% discount once you reach a certain purchase level). That allows me to build good quality, serviceable, relatively light wheels with sealed-bearing Taiwanese hubs, Sapim spokes, alloy nipples and Ti skewers for under $250/pair. That's tough to beat.

I haven't had any braking issues with these rims when used with Kool Stop Salmon pads, but their performance with Swissstop green pads is not great (it's probably the pads), wet or dry. They are much more consistent in roundness and straightness than the NOS tubular rims I've accumulated, but there is still some unavoidable variation in spoke tension with them. To date, it hasn't caused any issues.

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Dave B
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 4511
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

1/26/13 8:30 AM

Interesting

I wish they would have rated the Mavic CXP-33 rims. I've had two wheel sets built with them and been very pleased with their performance, stability and longevity. My current CXP-33 rear rim does have a rattle when turned slowly but it's not noticable when riding. It would have been interesting to know their opinion.

I really liked this comment on carbon rims:

"A good quality carbon wheel set will generally rival its aluminum counterparts in performance through increased strength and stiffness, and generally lighter weight, but with a cost penalty of in the range of $1,000-2,000. For those who can afford the expense of a quality carbon rim set, another important question to ask is “Can you afford to replace them?”

Their cost penalty may have to be paid twice.

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4528
Location: Nashua, NH

1/26/13 9:08 AM

What they didn't mention...

...is that there are good quality carbon rims available from manufacturers such as Gigantex in the $200-$300/rim range, which is only a $150-$450 increase over aluminum per pair of wheels. However, there's not a much of a weight savings when you're dealing with clinchers, so their main advantage is aerodynamic.

The fact that the repair cost is so much higher is definitely a serious concern, especially for those of us who are "self-sponsored".

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DPotter
Joined: 12 Jan 2004
Posts: 950
Location: Portland, Maine

1/27/13 8:13 AM

I was wondering about the CXP-33's also. When my open pros started giving me troubles, I built a pair of 33's they have been bomb proof.

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4528
Location: Nashua, NH

1/27/13 10:52 AM

I've heard that they're durable...

...but they're awfully heavy for a rim that's only 23mm deep.

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Dave B
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 4511
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

1/27/13 11:21 AM

Mavic claims 470 gms for a 700c CXP-33 or about 70 grams/pair heavier than Open Pros and not far from or even lighter than some of the rims evaluated in the link above.

I'm more than willing to put up with that small amount of extra weight to gain the durability and possibly a small aero advantage they provide.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17506
Location: Portland, OR

1/27/13 2:00 PM

Well, two things I have not seen. OpenPro rims that did not last for long, long periods, and an OP rim that weighed less than 435, usually 445-50 when I was weighing them...

That spoils some comparative math, unless the 33s top near 500, which would not surprise me.

They must weight the first rim off when new extruded dies are fitted for advertised weights. ;)

That said, of course the ones that come off right before the new die weigh more, but last longer. Funny that. ;)

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Nick Payne
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 2449
Location: Canberra, Australia

1/27/13 3:27 PM


quote:
They must weight the first rim off when new extruded dies are fitted for advertised weights

There's usually somewhere around a 10% weight difference between a rim extrusion from a new die and an extrusion from a die just about worn to the point of needing replacement.

I just weighed a spare CXP33 rim I have on an accurate Ohaus scale. 451 grams, which is about 20g less than the claimed weight...

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dddd
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 3279
Location: NorCal

1/27/13 7:30 PM

"I just weighed a spare CXP33 rim I have on an accurate Ohaus scale. 451 grams, which is about 20g less than the claimed weight..."

I remember thinking I had gotten a bargain when one of my CTL-370 rims weighed in at only 359g, pretty light for a 1980's clincher.

A 450g CXP-33 would be great for my CXer's rear wheel, but I'll probably put a wider rim on or go to tubulars between now and next season.

I dug up a few more pic's of the H+SON rim and found it doesn't have such a trad'l shape as I thought. The sidewalls are quite tall and there's that valve hole badge apparatus, yuck.

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