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Are you kidding me?
 

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4551
Location: Nashua, NH

11/11/19 7:15 PM

Are you kidding me?

Look at what Froomie had removed from his body!



Holy $hit! Now I'm even more convinced that he's not going to be factor in Tour, if he's even in it.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17552
Location: Portland, OR

11/11/19 7:33 PM

Elaine sez: in 20 plus years she has not been involved in surgery with any recon plate near that size. That upper bolt ga. had me "oh shit'ing on first glance.

Elaine agrees with your non contention assertion for 2019 TDF. It would be way cool to be wrong about that...

Here is a guy who will surely die by the sword if he does not stop/retire sooner than later IMO.

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Steve B.
Joined: 19 Jan 2004
Posts: 735
Location: Long Island, NY

11/11/19 8:19 PM

Heard he was moving to Team Skynet

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17552
Location: Portland, OR

11/12/19 12:31 AM

OK, I'll bite. "Team Skynet" ?

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Craig
Joined: 12 Jan 2004
Posts: 575

11/12/19 3:31 AM

Having no real proof, or qualifications to say anything about anything; I broke an ankle once, the small bone, fibula, and they screwed it together, and 6 weeks later I rode my bike to my doctor's appointment. It's given me no grief since, it doesn't even tell the weather. But I was never competitive.

Will Froome ride competitively again? How long has he been off? 5 months? That big chunk of hardware held everything perfectly in place to encourage proper healing. If the bone has properly knitted he's essentially had an extended hiatus. He will have lost some muscle mass and fitness, but not a lot. And the bone should be solid-ish. And he has a long winter of regimented training to get him in form for next June.

But he's also 34 years old. He had two, maybe three more competitive years before this happened, if he was lucky? Even without the broken bone he might not have been a threat next year.

Professional athletes, due to some balance of the best doctors available, being super fit, etc etc, seem to recover better than mere plebes like you and I. I've seen more than one NHL player return to regular duty after breaking an ankle in 4 to 5 weeks and continue to play for many years with no notable compromise in performance.

Froome's mileage may differ. Or maybe it won't. Should make for an interesting season next year. Can't wait to see.

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4551
Location: Nashua, NH

11/12/19 6:28 AM

It will take 4-6 weeks for the screw holes in the bone to completely fill in. Given the size and number of screws (there appears to be 2-3 missing from the photo), he's going to have to take it easy until he's fully healed. He probably also has a substantial surgical wound as well, which will take at least a couple of weeks to heal. There could be some muscle/tendon damage from the surgery, too. In addition, he will probably experience some degree of change to his leg geometry, which requires substantial time for adaptation. Pushing too hard, too soon can result in knee and hip problems. This is likely to be the most important factor in his recovery and return to competition.

This is far more damage than my hip fracture caused and it was a long time (years) before I was completely comfortable again. I was never as strong as prior to the injury. Granted, I was 7 years older than Froome at the time, but still...

Sparky, "Skynet" is a reference to the Terminator movies.

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KerryIrons
Joined: 12 Jan 2004
Posts: 3018
Location: Midland, MI

11/12/19 9:45 AM

Drillium


quote:
It will take 4-6 weeks for the screw holes in the bone to completely fill in


As of now, his bones look like the drillium that was popular in bike components in the '70s. While the holes might be filled in 4-6 weeks, they won't be "solid" until 8-10 weeks. I don't know if he was able to exercise after the installation of the hardware, but he undoubtedly lost significant muscle mass at some point in this journey. Very fit athletes do recover better and faster and can restore their performance much better than the average person, both due to genetics and motivation.

I fully agree that it is highly unlikely that Froome will be a threat this summer, or perhaps ever again.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17552
Location: Portland, OR

11/12/19 12:53 PM

The cupping Therapy will make him good as new overnight. ;)

https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/latest-news/chris-froome-shares-picture-undergoing-cupping-therapy-treatment-work-442330

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Craig
Joined: 12 Jan 2004
Posts: 575

11/12/19 7:25 PM


quote:
I fully agree that it is highly unlikely that Froome will be a threat this summer, or perhaps ever again.


Probably true. Maybe true. Likely true. But..... nice thing about cycling is that it's low impact. He can start rebuilding muscle long before the bone needs to take any substantial weight/force. He might even be able to ride a trainer before he can walk properly on it. But still, at 34, he's going to need a good year to get back his form which means he won't be seriously competing until he's 36. Time and tide wait for no man.

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4551
Location: Nashua, NH

11/12/19 8:27 PM

I wonder how long the "hickies" from cupping will take to heal?

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17552
Location: Portland, OR

11/12/19 10:37 PM

I remember Phelps had the dots in the pool @Olympics, mentioned in that link as well.

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Nick Payne
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 2455
Location: Canberra, Australia

11/13/19 1:25 AM

I wonder if his cupping and surroundings resembled at all that described by George Orwell in his essay "How the poor die". Relevant excerpt below:

In the year 1929 I spent several weeks in the HŰpital X, in the fifteenth ARRONDISSEMENT of Paris. The clerks put me through the usual third-degree at the reception desk, and indeed I was kept answering questions for some twenty minutes before they would let me in. If you have ever had to fill up forms in a Latin country you will know the kind of questions I mean. For some days past I had been unequal to translating Reaumur into Fahrenheit, but I know that my temperature was round about 103, and by the end of the interview I had some difficulty in standing on my feet. At my back a resigned little knot of patients, carrying bundles done up in coloured handkerchiefs, waited their turn to be questioned.

After the questioning came the bath ó a compulsory routine for all newcomers, apparently, just as in prison or the workhouse. My clothes were taken away from me, and after I had sat shivering for some minutes in five inches of warm water I was given a linen nightshirt and a short blue flannel dressing-gown ó no slippers, they had none big enough for me, they said ó and led out into the open air. This was a night in February and I was suffering from pneumonia. The ward we were going to was 200 yards away and it seemed that to get to it you had to cross the hospital grounds. Someone stumbled in front of me with a lantern. The gravel path was frosty underfoot, and the wind whipped the nightshirt round my bare calves. When we got into the ward I was aware of a strange feeling of familiarity whose origin I did not succeed in pinning down till later in the night. It was a long, rather low, ill-lit room, full of murmuring voices and with three rows of beds surprisingly close together. There was a foul smell, faecal and yet sweetish. As I lay down I saw on a bed nearly opposite me a small, round-shouldered, sandy-haired man sitting half naked while a doctor and a student performed some strange operation on him. First the doctor produced from his black bag a dozen small glasses like wine glasses, then the student burned a match inside each glass to exhaust the air, then the glass was popped on to the manís back or chest and the vacuum drew up a huge yellow blister. Only after some moments did I realize what they were doing to him. It was something called cupping, a treatment which you can read about in old medical text-books but which till then I had vaguely thought of as one of those things they do to horses.

The cold air outside had probably lowered my temperature, and I watched this barbarous remedy with detachment and even a certain amount of amusement. The next moment, however, the doctor and the student came across to my bed, hoisted me upright and without a word began applying the same set of glasses, which had not been sterilized in any way. A few feeble protests that I uttered got no more response than if I had been an animal. I was very much impressed by the impersonal way in which the two men started on me. I had never been in the public ward of a hospital before, and it was my first experience of doctors who handle you without speaking to you or, in a human sense, taking any notice of you. They only put on six glasses in my case, but after doing so they scarified the blisters and applied the glasses again. Each glass now drew about a dessert-spoonful of dark-coloured blood. As I lay down again, humiliated, disgusted and frightened by the thing that had been done to me, I reflected that now at least they would leave me alone. But no, not a bit of it. There was another treatment. coming, the mustard poultice, seemingly a matter of routine like the hot bath. Two slatternly nurses had already got the poultice ready, and they lashed it round my chest as tight as a strait-jacket while some men who were wandering about the ward in shirt and trousers began to collect round my bed with half-sympathetic grins. I learned later that watching a patient have a mustard poultice was a favourite pastime in the ward. These things are normally applied for a quarter of an hour and certainly they are funny enough if you donít happen to be the person inside. For the first five minutes the pain is severe, but you believe you can bear it. During the second five minutes this belief evaporates, but the poultice is buckled at the back and you canít get it off. This is the period the onlookers enjoy most. During the last five minutes, I noted, a sort of numbness supervenes. After the poultice had been removed a waterproof pillow packed with ice was thrust beneath my head and I was left alone. I did not sleep, and to the best of my knowledge this was the only night of my life ó I mean the only night spent in bed ó in which I have not slept at all, not even a minute.

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4551
Location: Nashua, NH

11/13/19 6:17 AM

I'm sure that cupping has something to do with "marginal gains".

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